The Day After Election Day

date: 2007/05/02 | release status: MR | release references: eri.JPG | date created: 2007:05:02

These are heavy days in America.

The acrimony is escalating, moment by over scrutinized, incendiary moment and chances are it’s sucked you in too. You’ve no doubt succumbed to the surrounding bitterness and allowed your heart to become toxic; poisoned by the false stories of who you believe the enemy to be or who you see as savior.

You’re probably feeling the weight of all the fear and fighting upon your shoulders these days, and it’s left you irritated and tired and sad.

November 8th will surely be a heavy day too.

Very likely on that day, half of you will feel compelled to gloat and the other half to grieve. There will be either total jubilation or complete dread, with either an overreaction.

But I don’t want to talk to you about that day. I want to talk to you about the day after that day—because it matters.

The day after Election Day you’re going to wake up and realize that the sun is still in its usual position in the sky and that you are still in yours there on the ground.

You’ll look around you and see the people you love and the place you know as home and you’ll remember that these things are all still true.

You’ll hear the familiar sounds of voices that are sweet music to you, and you’ll realize that they are the reason to be hopeful.

You’ll see your reflection in the mirror and you’ll realize that you are still you.

The day after Election day you’ll step outside and you’ll walk into the world around you—and you’ll see that you still have freedom:

You still have the freedom to speak and dream and feel and build.

You still have the freedom to choose compassion or contempt for those who are not like you.

You still have the freedom to build a bigger table wherever you gather.

You still have the freedom to be a healer or to inflict injury.

You still have the freedom to speak words that destroy or words that give life.

You still have the freedom to alter the small portion of the planet you happen to be standing on at any given moment.

The day after Election Day you’re still going to be responsible for who you are; for the relationships you nurture, for the way you spend your time and your money, for what you teach your children, for the way you respond to injustice, for the eyes through which you see other people.

You’re going to still fully own you and the choices you make, no matter what happened the night before. 

You’ll still have your faith convictions and those things you claim to believe about this life, and the space and time to prove it.

The day after Election Day you’re going to realize without any hyperbole, that you are America, and that your life will either leave it a more or less loving, beautiful, and compassionate place than when you arrived. 

That’s not to say that the day before doesn’t matter, or that you should remove yourself from the process and stay silent on the way there. Be present. Be passionate. Say everything you feel called to say, and vote the contents of your heart.

But the greatest mistake you could ever make, is either believing that hope is lost or that salvation is secured simply because of what transpires on Election Day. No human being gives your life meaning or renders it meaningless.

You get to decide that: with your voice, your hands, your words, your breath.

The day after Election Day will be the most important day of your life—because you will get to live it.

Be encouraged today.

Be encouraged on Election Day. 

Be greatly encouraged the day after.

 

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55 thoughts on “The Day After Election Day

  1. Charles commented on The Day After Election Day.

    in response to Gloriamarie Amalfitano:

    Anyone who wishes to share what I wrote may do so as long as my name is included as the author.

    Is that your real name? Sounds like a dish on the menu at Antonio’s. Seriously, that’s your real name?

    I find nthis comment condescending, patronizing, rude and xenophobic.

    • Well, that was not my intent. Some people use pen names—like say Mark Twain. So, is that your real name or your pen name—and which name would you like people to use? I am not going to post your article to my blog and then have you come back and sue me because I failed to attribute it to the “real you.”

  2. Rosemarie commented on The Day After Election Day.

    in response to Charles:

    Is that your real name? Sounds like a dish on the menu at Antonio’s. Seriously, that’s your real name?

    Rude, plain and simple.

    Thank you, Rosemarie

  3. Charles commented on The Day After Election Day.

    in response to Gloriamarie Amalfitano:

    Charles commented on The Day After Election Day. in response to Gloriamarie Amalfitano: Anyone who wishes to share what I wrote may do so as long as my name is included as the author. Is that your real name? Sounds like a dish on the menu at Antonio’s. Seriously, that’s your real name? I find […]

    Well, that was not my intent. Some people use pen names—like say Mark Twain. So, is that your real name or your pen name—and which name would you like people to use? I am not going to post your article to my blog and then have you come back and sue me because I failed to attribute it to the “real you.”

    If that was not your intent then you would have been better served simply asking if it is my real name or a pen name instead of making fun of my name by saying it sounded like a dish at an Italian restaurant. That is condescending, patronizing, rude and xenophobic..

    You did not even have to ask the question because I had given a blanket permission to use the piece as long as my name was attached as the author. So the “real” question you claim you were asking has already been answered so the only reason I can think of for you to say what you did was some prejudice against Italians.

  4. Suzanne Reed commented on The Day After Election Day.

    in response to Gloriamarie Amalfitano:

    Suzanne D Reed, Mr Trump thanks you for your vote.

    The RNC says my Johnson/Weld vote will help Hillary, the DNC says it will help Trump. I say it will help America, and I will sleep the sleep of one whose conscience is clear.

    #1) I really can’t understand why you would choose to believe anything the Trump campaign says when we have been informed that 91% of what they say is a lie.

    #2) After the reveal of the Republican Party platform, I find it hard to believe that anyone would want to take a chance that such evil comes to pass by “voting their conscience” because I can’t believe anyone’s conscience would risk a Trump presidency and the possibility of any of these things happening.

    #3) Whatever anyone might think of Hillary, at least the Democratic Party platform speaks of things that will actually benefit USians, not actively harm them such as the GOP platform will do.

    A vote for Trump is a vote for evil. A vote for a third party is a vote for Trump.

    History of voters voting for third parties teach us that in most cases, voting for the third party is a vote for the Republicans. So if anyone wants to risk it…

  5. “History of voters voting for third parties teach us that in most cases, voting for the third party is a vote for the Republicans. So if anyone wants to risk it…”
    Tell that to Bush Sr. in 1992, we left the RNC & voted for Ross Perot.
    Hillary is SO far down on my list of people I would want running things I would write in Putin before her.

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